The Age Of The Internet

The Age Of The Internet

Thoughts and ideas have spread like a virus since the inception of the internet. It’s allowed the oppressed to have their own voice. It’s also helped people from one point of the world to the other to communicate. Yes, the unlimited possibilities of the World Wide Web are only a click away. But while most people use the internet to buy stuff, it can do so much more than satiate the yearnings of consumers.

The Dark Side

The Dark Side

Secrets of a Shopaholic / Facebook

Most people have access to 1% of the World Wide Web. The other 99% contains a minimum of 4.5 billion websites, which can’t be found on Google or other search engines. In essence, our internet access barely scratches the surface. In reality, the internet is 400 to 500 times bigger than you imagined. What lies beneath is darkness and too expensive for the average person.

Untraceable

Untraceable

Curiousity

These sites don’t have IP addresses or a domain name. On this side of the internet, everything is anonymous. No one can be traced, and you can buy illegal substances, passports and more. Even the most experienced FBI hackers couldn’t break through the encrypted codes to access this area. This unique setup protects, buyers, sellers, and owners. And the technology they have delivered can make a far greater impact than you ever imagined.

21st Century Outlaws

21st Century Outlaws

BreakerLink

Remember when thieves used crowbars to steal cars? Well, those days are long gone. In the 21st century, criminals are geniuses, who uses sophisticated technology to get pretty much whatever their dark hearts desire. Their high-tech equipment and cyber knowledge allow them to hack into the last piece of technology you’d ever expect.

Grand Theft Auto

Grand Theft Auto

Len Conner / Facebook

For as long as there have been automobiles, there’s been car theft. But late-night muggings, smashing windows, and hot-wiring are obsolete. Stealing a car is now oh-so-easy. Car companies have made every effort to improve their security measures, but criminals are easily adapting to every single tactic. To say that they are geniuses would be an understatement.

The Perfect Heist

The Perfect Heist

Albert Lopez / Facebook

Every car model has a specific fault, and the key to performing the perfect heist involves finding it. Toyotas and Chevrolets? They’re super easy to infiltrate. So is Ford. Even a novice could do it. With a few keystrokes, immobilizers that prevent engines from turning on without the ignition key are bypassed. Alarms are disabled. It’s as if the car manufacturers are losing this fight. So, some companies are offering a few unconventional recommendations.

Key Cloning

Key Cloning

Mbreterit E Rrugeve Shqiptare / Facebook

Anyone who can afford a $200,000 Bentley would never consider scrapping their cars because they’ve lost their keys. Locksmiths can easily create a replacement key for most cars. There’s also a special guide on cloning keys available on the internet. Then, these thieves will steal a locksmiths’ tool and voila! But another popular method has become easier to implement.

Copying The Signal

Copying The Signal

Driving

In Solihull, England, a family became victims of this technological method of car theft. According to their security cameras, the thieves copied the signal of a Mercedes key they found in the house. This was all done with the help of a relay box, which allowed them to open the door, and drive off. But how were they able to steal the car without breaking any windows?

A Simple Solution

A Simple Solution

The Star

“The cyber threat is so dynamic and ever-changing, it’s hard for consumers to keep up,” explained Holly Hubert, who spent years working with the FBI in Buffalo, New York. So what’s an easy and affordable solution? Try aluminum foil. “Although it’s not ideal, it is the most inexpensive way.” But how can tin foil keep cars safe? Especially since thieves are using technology to get away with everything.

It’s Quick, Silent, And Easy

It’s Quick, Silent, And Easy

DiarioPanorama

Owners of modern cars have proximity keys, which unlock car doors and start engines without having to insert anything. So, one crook walked to the back of the house while trying to get the key’s signal using a special box. They suspected the key was on the ground floor. The signal was so strong that it penetrated through the walls, doors, and windows until it reached the first box. From there, the signal bounced off to the second box held by another thief. The entire process was quick and painless. And this government agent had something to add about these types of thefts.

Developing New Protections

Developing New Protections

Moshe Shlisel / Facebook

Moshe Shlisel from GuardKnox Cyber Technologies shared this obvious fault in car designs. He’s also managed to come up with cyber protection for missile defense systems for the Israeli Air Force, planes, and jets. Now, he’s offering his expertise to Audi, Mercedes-Benz, and Volkswagen to keep cars away from hackers. But what did he think about the former FBI agent’s advice?

Faraday Bag

Faraday Bag

Moshe Shlisel / Facebook

Shlisel suggests that car owners buy faraday bags, which are very affordable. These bags can be bought online, and have the power to shield signals from thieves. The foil-based cover will prevent the relax box from using its electromagnetic field to clone proximity keys. But can foil really offer the best defense against high-tech gadgetry?

Foil Their Plan

Foil Their Plan

Moshe Shlisel / Facebook

“You know it works if you can’t unlock a car door when the fob is inside,” said Shlisel. Meanwhile, insurance companies and car manufacturers are keeping a close eye on auto theft. But manufacturers need to step it up. Shlisel’s video showed how his engineer used his phone to hack into a semi-truck's system. But there’s another way that thieves can clone the proximity key, especially for those who keep their keys on the ground floor overnight.

Stash It Away

Stash It Away

Anita Organ‎ / Facebook

Cybersecurity experts suggest placing they keys in metal coffee cans. This will block the relay box, and keep thieves from physically finding the key if they break into your home. “The best thing you can do is keep your key in a small tin can wrapped with aluminum foil. But in a purse or pocket, just aluminum foil will do the job,” explained Shlisel. But even with these amazing suggestions, there’s a startling aspect to these auto theft reports.

A Safer Future

A Safer Future

Moshe Shlisel / Facebook

Hard-working families are more vulnerable than ever. The dark web has provided thieves with the technology and information needed to bypass the systems that were designed to prevent infiltration. But the simple hacks that Shlisel and Hubert have provided will ensure that our keys and vehicles remain safe. So, hopefully, as word spreads about these anti-hacking techniques, the future of vehicles everywhere will be safer.

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